Data

Your access to IMOS Wireless Sensor Network data discovery and exploration is through the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) Portal.

The Heron Island Wireless Sensor Network has five buoys with surface temperature sensors and six poles with single bottom mounted thermistors. An additional senor pole measures mid-water and bottom temperature, sea water pressure, conductivity and down welling photosynthetic radiative flux. There is also an automatic weather station on Senor Pole 5 that measures air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and liquid precipitation. All data is available in near real time.

Towing a buoy into place, Orpheus Island.

The One Tree Island Wireless Sensor Network consists of four sensor and one relay poles. The three sensor poles have thermistor strings that run from the micro atoll into the lagoon waters. Temperature is measures at the six depths between the surface and sea floor. Each pole also measures sea water pressure and Pole 1 measures conductivity. On the relay pole an automatic weather station air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, down welling photosynthetic radiative flux, relative humidity and liquid precipitation. All data is available in near real time.

The Davies Reef Wireless Sensor Network measures surface and bottom temperature and sea water pressure at each of the five buoys. Conductivity is measured at two of the buoys. An automatic weather station mounted on the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) tower measures air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, down welling photosynthetic radiative flux, relative humidity and liquid precipitation. There was also an underwater camera mounted near Sensor Float 2 from 2011 to 2013 and it is hoped that this can be replaced in late 2015. All data is available in near real time while historical images from the camera can be viewed here.

Underwater camera installed at Davies Reef from 2011 to 2013

The Orpheus Island Wireless Sensor Network has two buoys next to the research station that measure surface, mid-water and bottom temperature, and sea water pressure. One of the buoys also measures conductivity at two depths to look at changes in salinity from nearby river runoff. The network also includes three sensor poles located in the channel between Orpheus and Pelorus Islands that measure surface, mid-water and bottom temperature, sea water pressure and conductivity as a way of detecting on-shore upwelling. Single turbidity and down welling photosynthetic radiative fluxes are also measured. An automatic weather station mounted on one of the poles measures air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, down welling photosynthetic radiative flux, relative humidity and liquid precipitation. All data is available in near real time.

Relay Pole, Lizard Island.

The Lizard Island Wireless Sensor Network consists of four buoys that measure surface, multiple mid-water and bottom temperature, sea water pressure and two buoys measure conductivity. There is also one sensor pole that measures surface, mid-water and bottom temperature, sea water pressure, conductivity and down welling photosynthetic radiative flux. There is an automatic weather station mounted on one of the poles that measures air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, down welling photosynthetic radiative flux, relative humidity and liquid precipitation. There is also an above water camera installed in 2011. All data is available in near real time and images from the camera can be viewed here.

Seabird SBE39 sensor (temperature and depth) attached to a mooring line using an inductive adaptor to send data to the surface float.

The Myrmidon Reef Sensor Network had one main buoy that measured surface and bottom temperature, sea water pressure and conductivity between 2009 and 2014.

The Rib Reef Sensor Network had one main buoy that measured surface, mid-water and bottom temperature, sea water pressure at three depth and conductivity at two depths between 2009 and 2014.